I.D. This Weed?

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  • Gator 45/70

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    Have this weed taking over my yard, Anyone know what it's called and better yet, How to get rid of it, Thanks'
     

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    Labeeman

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    CU › Cooperative Extension › HGIC › Insects, Diseases & Other Problems › Weeds › HGIC 2323 Lawn Burweed
    Lawn Burweed

    Pesticides updated by Joey Williamson, HGIC Horticulture Extension Agent, Clemson University, 10/15. originally prepared by Morgan E. Judy, Extension Agent, Orangeburg County, Clemson University. New 06/09.

    HGIC 2323

    Printer Friendly Version (PDF)

    Nothing designates spring’s arrival like walking barefoot on a lawn of lush, green grass. This pleasant experience can often turn into a painful, sticky situation with the presence of lawn burweed. Other names for this weed are spurweed and stickerweed. Lawn burweed (Soliva sessilis) is a winter annual that germinates throughout thin turf in the fall months as temperatures cool. It remains small and inconspicuous during the cold winter months. However, as temperatures warm in the early spring, lawn burweed initiates a period of rapid growth and begins to form spine-tipped burs in the leaf axils. The seed is contained within the hooked bur.

    Description

    Lawn burweed is a low-growing, freely branched winter annual. It has opposite, sparsely hairy leaves that are twice divided into narrow segments or lobes.

    Lawn burweed growth habit.
    Lawn burweed growth habit.
    Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org

    Leaves are approximately ½ to 1½ inches long and ¼ to ½ inch wide. It has small (¼ inch or less in width), inconspicuous flowers in the spring. It attains an overall diameter of 6 inches and a height of 3 to 4 inches. The most prominent identifying characteristic of lawn burweed is its spine-tipped burs which are often hard to see but easily felt.
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    CU › Cooperative Extension › HGIC › Insects, Diseases & Other Problems › Weeds › HGIC 2323 Lawn Burweed
    Lawn Burweed

    Pesticides updated by Joey Williamson, HGIC Horticulture Extension Agent, Clemson University, 10/15. originally prepared by Morgan E. Judy, Extension Agent, Orangeburg County, Clemson University. New 06/09.

    HGIC 2323

    Printer Friendly Version (PDF)

    Nothing designates spring’s arrival like walking barefoot on a lawn of lush, green grass. This pleasant experience can often turn into a painful, sticky situation with the presence of lawn burweed. Other names for this weed are spurweed and stickerweed. Lawn burweed (Soliva sessilis) is a winter annual that germinates throughout thin turf in the fall months as temperatures cool. It remains small and inconspicuous during the cold winter months. However, as temperatures warm in the early spring, lawn burweed initiates a period of rapid growth and begins to form spine-tipped burs in the leaf axils. The seed is contained within the hooked bur.

    Description

    Lawn burweed is a low-growing, freely branched winter annual. It has opposite, sparsely hairy leaves that are twice divided into narrow segments or lobes.

    Lawn burweed growth habit.
    Lawn burweed growth habit.
    Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org

    Leaves are approximately ½ to 1½ inches long and ¼ to ½ inch wide. It has small (¼ inch or less in width), inconspicuous flowers in the spring. It attains an overall diameter of 6 inches and a height of 3 to 4 inches. The most prominent identifying characteristic of lawn burweed is its spine-tipped burs which are often hard to see but easily felt.

    Lawn burweed leaves and fruiting head.
    Lawn burweed leaves and fruiting head.
    Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org

    Cultural Control

    Maintain a healthy, dense lawn by fertilizing and liming according to soil test results and mowing at the proper height and frequency for your specific turfgrass. Healthy lawn grasses can outcompete burweed for light, water and nutrients and reduce the level of infestation. For more information on growing healthy turfgrass, see HGIC 1201, Fertilizing Lawns; HGIC 1205, Mowing Lawns; and HGIC 1207, Watering Lawns.

    Chemical Control

    Postemergence Control: The key factor to effectively controlling lawn burweed is to apply a postemergence herbicide during the winter months of December, January and February. The weed is smaller and easier to control during this time of year and has not yet developed the spine-tipped burs. Control is not impossible in March, April, and May, but the spines have already formed by this time and will remain after the weed dies. Because lawn burweed is a winter annual, it will begin to die in late spring as air temperatures reach 90 °F. Once the weed has reached a more mature state, multiple herbicide applications may be necessary which increases the potential for turfgrass injury. Dead or alive, lawn burweed poses a painful problem. The only solution to this is early identification and control.

    A three-way herbicide may be used on bermudagrass, zoysiagrass, centipedegrass, St. Augustinegrass and tall fescue. The active ingredients of a three-way herbicide typically include the following three broadleaf weed killers: 2,4-D, dicamba, and mecoprop (MCPP). Products that contain a higher percentage of dicamba and mecoprop will more effectively control lawn burweed. 2,4-D controls this weed less well.

    Herbicides containing 2,4-D should be applied at a reduced rate on St. Augustinegrass and centipedegrass to prevent damage to these lawns. If a second application is needed, apply the herbicide in spot treatments. Repeated applications of a three-way herbicide should be spaced according to label directions. Read the label for the rate to use on each turfgrass species. See Table 2 for examples of brands and products for use on residential lawns.

    In addition to three-way herbicides, there are several other herbicides that can be used for lawn burweed control in home lawns. Atrazine may be used for weed control in centipedegrass and St. Augustinegrass. Atrazine applied in November will have postemergence activity against newly sprouted lawn burweed seedlings and also will have preemergence activity against those that have not yet germinated during the fall. See Table 2 for examples of brands and products for use on residential lawns.

    Metsulfuron (such as in Manor Selective Herbicide and Blade Selective Herbicide) can be used for lawn burweed control in bermudagrass, centipedegrass, St. Augustinegrass, and zoysiagrass. Metsulfuron is packaged for landscape professionals. Due to the low application rate (¼ to 1 oz per acre, with a minimum of 20 gallons of water per acre) of these selective herbicide products, it may be more practical to hire a landscape professional to apply the treatment. A non-ionic surfactant (such as

    Southern Ag Surfactant for Herbicides) is also required at 0.25% by volume of spray mix for best control. Do not apply metsulfuron to lawn if over-seeded with annual ryegrass or over-seed for 8 weeks after application. Metsulfuron may cause temporary yellowing of turfgrass. Do not apply metsulfuron to turfgrass under heat and drought stress. Do not plant woody ornamentals in treated areas for one year after application of metsulfuron. Do not apply metsulfuron herbicides within two times the width of the drip line of desirable hardwood trees.

    CAUTION: Postemergence herbicides should not be applied during spring transition (green-up of lawn) or when air temperatures exceed 90 ºF as this can cause severe damage to the turfgrass. A newly seeded lawn should be mowed a minimum of three times before applying an herbicide.


    Table 1.Turf Tolerance to Postemergence Herbicides for Lawn Burweed Control.
    Herbicide Bermudagrass Centipedegrass St. Augustinegrass Tall Fescue Zoysiagrass
    S=Safe at labeled rates
    I= Intermediate safety, use at reduced rates
    NR= Not registered for use on and/or damages this turfgrass
    D=Fully dormant turf only
    atrazine D S S NR NR
    (3- way) 2,4-D +
    MCPP + dicamba S I I S S
    metsulfuron S S S-I NR S
    Preemergence Control: Isoxaben is a preemergence herbicide for control of lawn burweed, as well as many winter broadleaf weeds in bermudagrass, centipedegrass, St. Augustinegrass, zoysiagrass and tall fescue. Apply isoxaben in late September to early October before the winter weeds germinate. Do not reseed or overseed within 60 days of application, and do not apply to newly seeded lawns until the lawn has been mowed three times. Granular preemergence herbicides must be activated by ½ inch of rainfall or irrigation. See Table 2 for examples of brands and products for use on residential lawns.

    Note: Read and follow all label instructions when using herbicides. Repeat applications 10 to 14 days apart may be required for acceptable control by post-emergence herbicides. Do not mow within 48 hours after application of most herbicides. Most postemergence herbicides need to dry on the leaf surface before irrigation or rainfall occurs.


    Table 2. Herbicides to Control Lawn Burweed in Residential Turfgrass.
    Brands & Specific Products Herbicide Active Ingredients % Active Ingredient in Product Turfgrass Labeled for Use
    Note: There are many broadleaf weed killers in the stores, and many are similar to the 3-way herbicides, but have additional weed killers added. They may also work to control lawn burweed, but these additional components often restrict to which type of lawn they can be applied. Read the label.
    Ferti-lome Weed-Out Lawn Weed Killer (Concentrate) 2,4-D
    Mecoprop
    Dicamba 5.88%
    5.45%
    1.21% St Augustinegrass
    Centipedegrass
    Bermudagrass
    Zoysiagrass
    Tall Fescue
    Southern Ag Lawn Weed Killer with Trimec® (Concentrate) 2,4-D
    Mecoprop
    Dicamba 3.05%
    5.30%
    1.29% St Augustinegrass
    Centipedegrass
    Bermudagrass
    Zoysiagrass
    Tall Fescue
    Lilly Miller Lawn Weed Killer (Concentrate) 2,4-D
    Mecoprop
    Dicamba 9.41%
    2.27%
    1.04% St Augustinegrass
    Centipedegrass
    Bermudagrass
    Zoysiagrass
    Tall Fescue
    Bonide Weed Beater Lawn Weed Killer Concentrate 2,4-D
    Mecoprop
    Dicamba 7.59%
    1.83%
    0.84% St Augustinegrass
    Centipedegrass
    Bermudagrass
    Zoysiagrass
    Tall Fescue
    Hi-Yield Atrazine Weed Killer Atrazine 4.0% St Augustine
    Centipede
    Southern Ag Atrazine St Augustine Weed Killer Atrazine 4.0% St Augustine
    Centipede
    Image Herbicide for St Augustine & Centipede with Atrazine Atrazine 4.0% St Augustine
    Centipede
    Ferti-lome Weed Out Broadleaf Weed Control with Gallery Isoxaben (pre-emergence) 0.38% St Augustinegrass
    Centipedegrass
    Bermudagrass
    Zoysiagrass
    Tall Fescue
    Harrell’s Fertilizer with Gallery Isoxaben (plus 0-0-7 (pre-emergence) 0.38% St Augustinegrass
    Centipedegrass
    Bermudagrass
    Zoysiagrass
    Tall Fescue
    Page maintained by: Home & Garden Information Center


    This information is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement of brand names or registered trademarks by the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service is implied, nor is any discrimination intended by the exclusion of products or manufacturers not named. All recommendations are for South Carolina conditions and may not apply to other areas. Use pesticides only according to the directions on the label. All recommendations for pesticide use are for South Carolina only and were legal at the time of publication, but the status of registration and use patterns are subject to change by action of state and federal regulatory agencies. Follow all directions, precautions and restrictions that are listed.

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    Lawn burweed leaves and fruiting head.
    Lawn burweed leaves and fruiting head.
    Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
     

    DAVE_M

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    I've had that stuff grow in my yard before. Don't know what it is, but I know that RoundUp kills it easily :)

    I've seen it grow like wildfire in places that stay damp.
     

    Labeeman

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    Yes, Roundup will smoke it (pardon the pun) but it will also kill your desireable turf also. The link had a lot of info but you can go buy what you need at Home Depot or lowes to control it and not hurt your lawn.
     

    DAVE_M

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    Yes, Roundup will smoke it (pardon the pun) but it will also kill your desireable turf also. The link had a lot of info but you can go buy what you need at Home Depot or lowes to control it and not hurt your lawn.

    Judging by the photo, there isn't much "desirable turf" anyway. Most likely due to the overgrowth of the weeds. If you have good grass and weeds pop up, control it. If the weeds have taken over, burn it all down.
     

    Manimal

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    Soliva sessilis aka Bindi weed aka Burrweed aka "Omg wt* ssssssssssssss aaaaaahhhhh"

    Let it grow until it's a nice handful, maybe months, and then pull it up and throw it away before the burrs harden. Doing that will pretty quickly, and permanently (unless something brings more in), remove them from your yard and soil seed bank. It's nice to walk on before the seed hulls harden, pretty too, and where it grows it will shade out other weeds.

    I like being pate to parties....

    ...and now back to lurking.
     

    gwpercle

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    Have this weed taking over my yard, Anyone know what it's called and better yet, How to get rid of it, Thanks'
    I Got It Too !
    Would love to know how to get rid of the nasty stuff ...
    Right now I haven't found a good treatment for it so I been pulling it up ...
    but it grows back faster than I can pull it so I'm throwing in the towel !
    Gary
     
    Last edited:

    Magdump

    Don’t troll me bro!
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    blast from the past huh lol... thats stickers... lol dont believe me, let the yard dry up and step on them barefoot lol
    Yup, that’s what we called them growing up. A good measure of how tough a kid you were in the 70’s was whether you could barefoot it through a yard full of stickers. Had them about 12 years ago in our yard and used the hose in Scott’s x2 treatments one spring and they finally thinned out here.
     

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